Arts

Mona Suzuki ’19 Takes Advantage of Senior Recital to Showcase for Friends and Family

D. Zhu/The Phillipian

Mona Suzuki ’19 wanted her Senior Recital to not only be a culmination of her musical career at Andover, but also an opportunity for her to show her improvement and passion to her friends and family.

Beginning with several bouncing notes, Mona Suzuki ’19 moved her bow swiftly across her violin during her final piece. Accompanied by a pianist, the song reached its climax when the notes came to a halting stop; finally, with a series of fast paced notes, Suzuki finished her rendition with two strong finishing bow strokes.

“My favorite part [of the recital] was probably after I played it. Just getting the applause and people telling me that they were proud of me was great. I’d really wanted to them to get to hear me play because I had practiced so much and did the best I could, so receiving that support meant a lot to me. It’s just really nice when people hear you and you’re able to put your efforts out there,” said Suzuki.

Last Sunday afternoon in the Timken Room, Suzuki performed her Senior recital. She played all three movements of “Suite Italienne” by Stravinsky, the Tomaso Antonio Vitali’s “Chaconne,” and ended with the “Danse Espagnole” by Manuel de Falla. According to Suzuki, she saw the recital as an opportunity to showcase the improvement she made over her time at Andover.

Suzuki said, “I’ve improved a lot since I’ve arrived here in terms of technique and musicality. Because I was fourteen when I arrived, I didn’t know how to play the way I do now. But preparing for recitals and performances all throughout the years, I’ve really seen my playing and technique improve, and I think I showcased that.”

Another key reason why Suzuki chose to perform was to show how her musical career has changed and improved to her closest confidants. Her school friends, as well as her family, came to her recital to support her.

“I [wanted to have a senior recital] because I just wanted to conclude my musical career here. Obviously, I had already done my Senior Concerto, but I wanted to do something in the spring because I still wanted to get to play and have people listen to me, so I planned one out. It was nice getting to have the people that I care about—my friends and family—come and hear me play,” said Suzuki.

William Duan ’19, an audience member, friend, and fellow musician to Suzuki believes that Senior recitals provide opportunity for players to be praised for their work. At the same time, he also thinks that they are good ways for musicians to pay back those who have supported them.

“[Senior recitals] provide seniors an opportunity to feel appreciated for their craft—by their friends, their families, by their teachers, by the entire school really. But it’s also for the seniors too, a way for them to repay Andover for their wonderful four years that they are here and play music for,” said Duan.